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The Seasons of the Church Year

Dennis Bratcher

We keep track of time and seasons of the year by using calendars that provide us opportunities to observe, commemorate, and celebrate certain events or occasions. The changing seasons of the year also provide us with recurring opportunities to celebrate the Christian Faith in worship. The Christian church, following earlier Jewish tradition, has long used the seasons of the year as an opportunity for festivals and holidays, sacred time set aside to worship God as the Lord of life.

While Jewish celebration revolves around the Exodus from Egypt, the Christian Church year focuses on the life and ministry of Jesus. The sequence of festivals from Advent to Resurrection Sunday becomes an annual spiritual journey for worshippers as they kneel at the manger, listen on a hillside, walk the streets of Jerusalem, hear the roar of the mob, stand beneath the cross, and witness the resurrection! The rest of the church year provides opportunity to reflect on the meaning of the coming of Jesus and his commission to his people to be a light to the world.

Beyond Christmas and Easter, many churches in the Protestant tradition do not celebrate the various seasons of the church year in any deliberate or sustained way . However, the observance of the seasons of the church year has a long history in the life of the Christian Faith. When most of the people in the church were poor and had no access to education, the church festivals and the cycle of the church year provided a vehicle for teaching the story of God and his actions in human history. Even in the Old Testament, the concept of sacred time became a vehicle for teaching the faith (for example, Exodus 12-13). Planned and purposeful observance of the Christian seasons and festivals can become an important tool for education and discipleship in the Faith, as well as a vehicle for spiritual growth and vitality.

As a congregation moves through the church calendar, they are presented in an organized way with the opportunity to talk about, reflect upon, and respond to the entire range of faith confessions that lie at the heart of the Christian Faith. This is important, not only for the vitality of the whole community, but especially for children to become aware in the context of community celebration those things that are important to their Faith (Deut 6:20-25).

The Christian calendar is organized around two major centers of Sacred Time: Advent, Christmas, and Epiphany; and Lent, Holy Week, and Easter, concluding at Pentecost. The rest of the year following Pentecost is known as Ordinary Time, from the word "ordinal," which simply means counted time (First Sunday after Pentecost, etc.).  Ordinary Time is used to focus on various aspects of the Faith, especially the mission of the church in the world.  Some church traditions break up ordinary time into a Pentecost Season, (Pentecost until the next to last Sunday of August) and Kingdomtide (last Sunday of August until the beginning of Advent).

 
 

A sanctuary banner.

Some Protestant churches also celebrate other days not specifically tied to these cycles, such as Reformation Sunday and All Saints Sunday.  These are becoming increasingly popular ways to flesh out the themes of the Church in the World during Ordinary Time by focusing on heritage and the faithfulness of those in the past. A few churches are beginning to observe some of the feast days for saints, such as the Sunday nearest October 4 for Francis of Assisi, in order to call attention to particular emphases throughout the year.  It is an attempt to allow the Church and its history rather than secular culture to set the agenda for the Church's teaching and ministry.

Following the church year is more than simply marking time on a calendar or a note in the church bulletin.  Every effort should be made to use the various aspects of the church year as an opportunity to tell the story of God's redemptive work in the world.

Many churches have relied almost solely on the spoken word to carry the burden of proclamation.  However, even in the Old Testament the services of worship involved all of the senses: sight, smell, taste, touch, as well as hearing.  Modern learning theory also indicates that the more senses are involved in an experience, the more impact it makes, especially for children.  This suggests that the worship experience should be concerned with more than just preaching and music (see Word and Table: Reflections on a Theology of Worship). At the very least, worship should involve visual as well as auditory experience.

Paraments for Lent

One simple avenue that can assist in tracking the seasons of the church year for worshippers, as well as providing a visual context for worship, is the use of Colors of the Church Year in the sanctuary. Different colors are associated with different seasons, and the changing colors of communion table and pulpit coverings (called paraments), or wall banners, provide visual clues for the seasons.

In some church traditions such sanctuary symbols are large and ornate, and correspondingly expensive, However, they do not have to be. It is not unusual in smaller churches, or in churches that do not have a high church or liturgical tradition, for members of the church or youth group to construct simple yet visually effective paraments, banners, or other symbols for the sanctuary. This approach involves the congregation in helping creatively to mark the seasons of the Church Year, and thereby participating in the "art and environment" of the sanctuary.

The exact time of the seasons, and even some of the seasons themselves, differ within various traditions, especially in the Eastern Orthodox tradition. This is due both to various historical emphases, different ways of calculating the days, as well as using different calendars. For our purposes, we will follow the practices most common in the Western church, and those most used by Protestant churches (largely shared by both Anglican and Catholic traditions), while recognizing the value in understanding the perspectives of other traditions.


The Church Year begins with Advent in November/December.
We are presently in YEAR A of readings in the Revised Common Lectionary.
Year A:  2010-2011, 2013-2014, 2016-2017
Year B:  2011-2012, 2014-2015, 2017-2018
Year C:  2012-2013, 2015-2016, 2018-2019

Click below for information about the various Seasons and Holy Days that comprise The Christian Church Year. Except as noted, the dates are for 2013-2014, Year A of the Revised Common Lectionary,  Year 2  of the the Daily Office (daily readings) of the Book of Common Prayer. (For a more complete calendar, see The Church Year, 2014)

Advent [Year A] (Dec 1 - Dec 24, 2013)
Christmas (Dec 25, 2013 - Jan 5, 2014)
The Twelve Days of Christmas (Dec 25, 2014 - Jan 5, 2014)
Epiphany (and Ordinary Time until Lent) (January 6 - March 3, 2014)
Shrove Tuesday or Mardi Gras (March 4, 2014)
Ash Wednesday (March 5, 2014)
Lent (March 5 - April 19, 2014)
Holy Week (April 13 - 19 [20], 2014)
Maundy Thursday (April 17, 2014)
Good Friday (April 18, 2014)
Easter (April 20, 2014)
Pentecost (June 8, 2014)
Ordinary Time (June 16 - Nov 29, 2014)

Advent [Year B] (Nov 30 - Dec 24, 2014)

Dates of the Church Year, RCL Year A, 2014 (2013-2014)
Dates of the Church Year, RCL Year B, 2012 (2011-2012)
Dates of the Church Year, RCL Year C, 2013 (2012-2013)

-Dennis Bratcher, Copyright © 2013, Dennis Bratcher - All Rights Reserved
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